Learning Virtue

by Paul Schaeffer

In elementary school I learned the story of Cincinnatus from the book Famous Men of Rome. When I try to recall the stories I learned that year, he is the first one to come to mind. Romulus and Remus came second, followed by Horatius. So I had to ask myself, “Why would Cincinnatus come even before the founders of Rome?”

(more…)

The Science of Teaching Science

by Paul Schaeffer

My high school chemistry teacher’s favorite word was “wonder.” Nothing was done in class because some outside power required us to do it. After a while, we all knew that we learned what we did because it was worth knowing–and that’s why we wanted to learn it. The first day of class he taught us to use our sense of wonder in our observations.

(more…)

Rhetoric: Much More Than Public Speaking

by Paul Schaeffer

Current educational trends either ignore public speaking altogether or attempt to teach it by making the student do it repetitively. However, this approach does not seem to be working. Look at the people who make their living by speaking to the public: talk show hosts try to persuade their listeners by shouting more than their opponent while others bore their audiences to death with long, drawn-out monologues. The fruits of our education beg us to find out what current trends miss. (more…)

The Egyptian Gold

by Martin Cothran There is an aspect of the Exodus story that many people forget. Moses had stood before Pharaoh more than once asking him to let his people go, and plague upon plague had been brought against the Egyptians as a result of Pharaoh’s refusal.  There were plagues of blood, frogs, Read more…