Latin is the Next Step After Phonics

Latin in elementary school, after phonics? This may sound like a new and experimental idea, but it’s really an old and traditional one. Have you ever read Goodbye Mr. Chips or Anne of Green Gables? If so, you may have noticed that the students seemed to spend a lot of time studying Latin grammar and that it was completed before high school. In fact, this is where the name grammar school came from—from the days Read more…

Why Latin Again?

We have come a long way over the past 15 years. I still remember when all we were was Cheryl Lowe (mom), Brian Lowe (son), and me, and all we had to offer was a little blue book called Latina Christiana. As you can imagine, we have a few more things to offer now than we did way back then. But while we have more products and services to offer, the vision that we had Read more…

In Defense of Classical Education

Tracy Lee Simmons is the director of the Dow Journalism program at Hillsdale College and holds a masters degree in Classics from Oxford University. This article is an excerpt from his Climbing Parnassus, published by ISI (www.isi.org). Reproduced with permission. Readers of English novels or American biography have often noticed the peculiar spectacle of young innocents getting carted off to school only to be cast into the thorny thicket of two ancient and difficult tongues: Read more…

The Egyptian Gold

by Martin Cothran There is an aspect of the Exodus story that many people forget. Moses had stood before Pharaoh more than once asking him to let his people go, and plague upon plague had been brought against the Egyptians as a result of Pharaoh’s refusal.  There were plagues of blood, frogs, and gnats; of wild animals, pestilence, and boils; and plagues of hail, locusts, and darkness. And then the final stroke: “Yet one plague more will I bring Read more…

The Great Educational Shipwreck

Written by Martin Cothran & Cheryl Lowe, this article was first published in The Classical Teacher, 2010. Reproduced here with permission. We live in the aftermath of a cultural shipwreck, and this is nowhere more apparent than in the field of education. Our schools cast about for solutions to their educational woes, and they find, here and there, pieces of the system of classical education that once ruled the educational waves. The result has been Read more…

The Why of Classical Education

Written by Dr. John Seel, this article was first published in The Classical Teacher, Winter 2006. Reproduced here with permission. Parenting is first and foremost a responsibility of discipleship. Discipleship is not about activities and programs, but the transformation of the heart. The transformation of the heart begins with the framing of beliefs–what we assume to be true about others, the world, and ourselves. “Education,” said Sister Mariam Joseph, “is the highest of arts in Read more…

Two Methods of Instruction

Written by Andrew Kern Classical education rouses the student’s mind to action through two methods: the Didactic and the Dialectic. Let’s take a brief look at each of these modes of instruction. The Didactic Method If you have heard the word “didactic,” it was probably used for lectures or some other form of instruction in which the active teacher presented information to the passive student. That is not how the word was used in the Read more…

De Optimo Genere Magistrorum

Education is a trendy field, prone to numerous fads and fashions. One of the current trends has to do with what are called “learning styles.” Children, it is said, have different learning styles, and, according to the theory’s adherents, these learning styles are supposed to determine to a greater or lesser degree how each child is taught. Some children are “visual learners,” it is said, and others “auditory learners.” The visual learner is to be Read more…