Why Classical?

The Liberal Arts, by Sister Miriam Joseph

Sister Miriam Joseph was a member of the Sisters of the Holy Cross. She earned her doctorate at Columbia University and served as professor of English at St. Mary’s College from 1931 to 1960. She learned the trivium from Mortimer Adler, who instructed her and the teaching staff at St. Mary’s College on how to […]

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Who needs to read, anyway?

The College Board announced last week that this years SAT reading scores were the “lowest on record.” In fact, their scores in math and writing also went down. E. D. Hirsch, Jr. pointed out that the problem is that, instead of having students actually, like, read, they are being taught how to do well on […]

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Grade inflation (and self-delusion) in America’s high schools

Average grades have increased at America’s high schools every year since 1991 despite the fact that ACT scores have remained flat, reports economist Mark Perry.

Maybe this is good. Maybe we will all feel better about ourselves now that we think we are smarter than we really are. […]

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Americans may be the best, but they ain’t the brightest in math

 

According to Chester Finn, not only do American students compare poorly to students in other countries on math proficiency, but even students from the highest performing American states still get beat out by a bevy of nations.

Read the report here.

by Martin Cothran

originally published […]

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Your child left behind: The sorry state of education in the U. S.

Here is the Atlantic magazine, in a new article, “Your Child Left Behind,” on the sorry state of education in the United States:

Stanford economist Eric Hanushek and two colleagues recently conducted an experiment to answer just such questions, ranking American states and foreign countries side by side. Like our recruiter, they looked […]

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Sleep

by Martin Cothran

One of the charges brought against classic literature by the champions of “YA” (note the jargonistic use of the acronym)–“Young Adult”–books that have been the subject of recent comments on my blog–is that the classics aren’t “relevant.” They don’t “speak” to modern people. I thought about these remarks when I was […]

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Teaching great literature vs. teaching pop teen literature in schools: Another indication of what’s wrong with education

by Martin Cothran

Well my post in 2009 about a Kentucky school that required a teacher to cut the teen pop literature in a college preparatory course in favor of books that, like, actually belong in a college prep course has apparently made it on some teachers’ loop and I’m getting comments on the […]

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Don’t Know Much about Education

by Martin Cothran

The chief reason schools are failing is that people don’t know what the problem is. And the reason they don’t know what the problem is is because the educational establishment is telling us that it is something other than what it is. We need more technology; we need more tests; we need […]

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Latin is the Next Step After Phonics

by Cheryl Lowe

Latin in elementary school, after phonics? This may sound like a new and experimental idea, but it’s really an old and traditional one. Have you ever read Goodbye Mr. Chips or Anne of Green Gables? If so, you may have noticed that the students seemed to spend a lot of time studying […]

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Why Latin Again?

by Martin Cothran

We have come a long way over the past 15 years. I still remember when all we were was Cheryl Lowe (mom), Brian Lowe (son), and me, and all we had to offer was a little blue book called Latina Christiana. As you can imagine, we have a few more things […]

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In Defense of Classical Education

by Tracy Lee Simmons

Readers of English novels or American biography have often noticed the peculiar spectacle of young innocents getting carted off to school only to be cast into the thorny thicket of two ancient and difficult tongues: Greek and Latin. By threat of stinging rod, they were made to memorize the words and […]

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The Great Educational Shipwreck

by Martin Cothran & Cheryl Lowe

We live in the aftermath of a cultural shipwreck, and this is nowhere more apparent than in the field of education. Our schools cast about for solutions to their educational woes, and they find, here and there, pieces of the system of classical education that once ruled the educational […]

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The Why of Classical Education

by Dr. John Seel

Parenting is first and foremost a responsibility of discipleship. Discipleship is not about activities and programs, but the transformation of the heart. The transformation of the heart begins with the framing of beliefs–what we assume to be true about others, the world, and ourselves. “Education,” said Sister Mariam Joseph, “is the […]

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Two Methods of Instruction

by Andrew Kern

Classical education rouses the student’s mind to action through two methods: the Didactic and the Dialectic. Let’s take a brief look at each of these modes of instruction.

The Didactic Method
If you have heard the word “didactic,” it was probably used for lectures or some other form of instruction in […]

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De Optimo Genere Magistrorum

by Martin Cothran

Education is a trendy field, prone to numerous fads and fashions. One of the current trends has to do with what are called “learning styles.” Children, it is said, have different learning styles, and, according to the theory’s adherents, these learning styles are supposed to determine to a greater or lesser degree […]

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