My new article, a response to a blogger who champions specialization over being well-rounded (and widely educated), is now up at Memoria Press:

I find it interesting that, instead of some stereotypical daughter of the landed gentry, Ms. Trunk did not mention, say, the 19th century German scientists, who, in addition to having studied mathematics and science, were broadly and classically educated, which meant that they learned Latin and Greek and read the Great Books. Or even the great philosophers of the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries, who in addition to having studied Latin and Greek and read the Great Books, had mastered mathematics and the sciences. Each was better at what he specialized in because he had mastered other disciplines as well.

Read the rest here.

 

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